News & Publications

HANDS-FREE GEORGIA ISN’T THE ONLY NEW LAW TO HIT THE BOOKS

By David S. Fried, Fried & Bonder, LLC. New laws effective July 1, 2018 may impact your decision to purchase a new car, change your neighborhood firefighters’ benefits, help out concert promotors in Georgia, and allow your dental hygienist to provide basic dental care without a dentist present.  So read on… Buying or Leasing a […]
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Recovering for Injuries Caused by the Government

We’ve all been driving or riding on the streets of Atlanta, when all of a sudden—BADONK!—you drive through an enormous pothole. Maybe you got a flat tire, or your alignment was knocked out of place. Maybe you got lucky and escaped without any property damage at all. While driving into an unseen pothole is never […]
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Hands Free Georgia Act – Tackling Distracted Drivers

By David S. Fried, Fried & Bonder, LLC. In 2016 Fried & Bonder wrote about AT&T’s program “It Can Wait,” aimed at ending texting and driving.  Cell phones and texting affect the brain in ways similar to gambling or drugs. According to now generally accepted wisdom, we compulsively check our phones because every time we […]
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What To Do Following a Car Wreck

Whether moderate or severe, being involved in a car wreck is a scary experience. Often times following impact, the parties involved in a wreck are panicked and somewhat disoriented. However, if you are able to follow these instructions without further injuring yourself, you can greatly benefit yourself and your potential case: Documentation: if you are […]
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Fried and Bonder Wins!

Fried & Bonder defeated a text spammer’s first attempt at dismissing a Telephone Consumer Protection Act class action. Even if you consent to receiving texts the sender MUST give you a method to opt-out.
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8th Circuit: Obesity Not an ADA-Protected Disability

In previous posts, we’ve contemplated whether obesity might qualify as an ADA-covered disability under the more relaxed standards ushered in by the 2009 amendments to the Act.  Courts are answering that question mostly in the negative.  In Morriss v. BNSF Railway Co. (April 5, 2016), the Eight Circuit joined the Second and Sixth Circuits in […]
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A Whirlwind Month for Sexual Orientation Discrimination Claims

Since Congress enacted Title VII in 1964, federal courts have almost uniformly declined to recognize a statutory claim based on sexual orientation discrimination.  The prevailing opinion has been that sex discrimination is different than sexual orientation discrimination and—while Title VII is clearly meant to prohibit the former—there is no indication that Congress also meant to […]
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Must The Jury Apportion? Appellate Court Says No…Sort Of…For Now

Georgia’s apportionment statute requires a jury, upon a party’s request, to apportion fault among all the bad actors responsible for an injury, whether or not those bad actors are actually parties to the case. O.C.G.A. § 51-12-33(b)&(c). So what happens when the jury declines to apportion any fault to an admitted bad actor, despite overwhelming […]
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EEOC: Employers Must Individually Assess Prospective Employees’ Disability Status

Cessna recently paid six figures to settle a disability discrimination lawsuit brought by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) alleging that Cessna maintained a company-wide, illegal hiring practice. The practice in question: Cessna disqualified from consideration prospective employees who had a history of temporary disability or workers’ compensation restrictions.  In the case at issue, a […]
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